I don’t see myself as a man with a disability, but as someone trying to share an artistic vision and talent.
— Nathan Plung
 Nathan Plung, avid traveler, exploring the architecture of Italy while finding inspiration for his next work of art.

Nathan Plung, avid traveler, exploring the architecture of Italy while finding inspiration for his next work of art.

Nathan Plung.     Artist.

I began teaching myself how to cross-stitch at age 11, initially as a therapeutic tool to help with my fine motor skills. In addition to it being great therapy, both physically and mentally, my art has become a way for me to meditate and to rise above the troubles that living life with a disability often present.

 

After starting off with a few packaged kits, I fell in love with the medium but not the selection I had to choose from. That is when I came up with the idea of creating my own designs, transforming my art from something I did into who I was. From there, it was a short step to recognizing I wanted to create and share art with others for my entire life. 

 Self Portrait of the artist -  Nathan Plung

Self Portrait of the artist - Nathan Plung

The subject of my art is quite varied. A big share of my work is pop art portraits. Beginning with a self-portrait, I began to use photos of people as my subjects. To some degree, I was influenced by Andy Warhol—intending to capture personality as much as the physical characteristics of my subjects.


The same personalization is true when I make representations of masterpieces with thread (a labor of love for my private collection). These works are my interpretation—of Chagall, Picasso—intending to capture the original soul and vibrancy, but with my own overtones and always with a goal of demonstrating the unique medium in which I have chosen to work.

 

As with any artist, the thought of having my work hanging in people’s homes, being on display, is inspiring. My art is still therapy, mental and physical, but it is also the way I express myself, to myself and to others.

 

I don’t see myself as a man with a disability, but as someone trying to share an artistic vision and talent. I believe most people see this side of me when they view my art, and that those viewing this show will see that side of me as well. 

Click here to learn more about my craft, the Art of Cross stitch.

   Photo by   SARAH GORDON — Tri-City Herald   

 Photo by SARAH GORDON — Tri-City Herald